Georgian "Unis Par L'Amour" Twin Heart Betrothal Ring

$5,500.00
About Details History
This exceptional twin heart betrothal ring dates to the early Georgian era. Engagement rings were not commonly given in this period, however, when they were, they typically featured one, or sometimes two, heart(s) to represent the union. This ring is rich with meaning, some of it symbolic, and some if it quite literal. The twin hearts represent the couple - bound by love - and the diamond crown arcing over the pair symbolizes the reign of fidelity over the marriage. The gemstones themselves also have significance, the emerald is the preserver of love, the ruby (this one quite pale and more pink than red) represents passion, and the diamonds symbolize longevity. The enameled words along the hoop say in French what the gems and ornament imply, "Unis Par L'Amour" or "United By Love". This very special and rare ring is a size 3.5 and cannot be resized.

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  • Materials: 18k yellow gold, silver, black enamel, 3.4 x 3.9mm pear shaped emerald, 3 x 3.4mm pale ruby, 5 rose cut diamonds (4 x 1.5mm rose cut diamonds, 1 2mm)
  • Age: c. 1740
  • Condition: Excellent - very minor wear to the enamel, diamond setting on one of the shoulders shows signs of repair
  • Size: US 3.5, cannot be resized
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
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GEORGIAN (1714 - 1837) The Georgian Era was named for the English Kings George I, II, III and IV. Within the powerful nations of France and England, fine gemstone jewelry was worn only by the extremely wealthy, and the styles were regal and ornate. As imperialist war raged in the Americas, Caribbean, Australia, and beyond, the jewelry industry benefited: colored gems from all over the empire became newly available. A mix of artistic influences from around Europe contributed to the feminine, glittering jewels of the era. Dense, ornate Baroque motifs from Italy showed up in Georgian jewelry, as did French Rococo’s undulating flora and fauna. Neoclassical style made use of Greek and Roman motifs, which were newly popular due to the recently uncovered ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Lapidary methods improved: the dome-shaped rose cut was popular, as was the “old mine cut”, a very early iteration of today’s round brilliant cut. The boat-shaped marquise diamond cut was developed around this time, supposedly to imitate the smile of Louis XV’s mistress, the marquise de Pompadour. Paste—an imitation gemstone made from leaded glass—was newly developed in the 18th century, and set into jewelry with the same creativity and care as its more precious counterparts. Real and imitation gems were almost always set in closed-backed settings, lined on the underside with thin sheets of foil to enhance the color of the stone and highlight it's sparkle. This makes Georgian rings tough for modern women to wear, especially on an everyday basis: genteel, jewelry-owning ladies of the 18th century were not famous for working with their hands like we are. Nor did they wash their hands as much as we do. Water will virtually ruin a foiled setting, so take special care with your Georgian ring. Very little jewelry from this period is still in circulation, and it's very difficult to repair.
less
more

About Details History
This exceptional twin heart betrothal ring dates to the early Georgian era. Engagement rings were not commonly given in this period, however, when they were, they typically featured one, or sometimes two, heart(s) to represent the union. This ring is rich with meaning, some of it symbolic, and some if it quite literal. The twin hearts represent the couple - bound by love - and the diamond crown arcing over the pair symbolizes the reign of fidelity over the marriage. The gemstones themselves also have significance, the emerald is the preserver of love, the ruby (this one quite pale and more pink than red) represents passion, and the diamonds symbolize longevity. The enameled words along the hoop say in French what the gems and ornament imply, "Unis Par L'Amour" or "United By Love". This very special and rare ring is a size 3.5 and cannot be resized.

less
more

  • Materials: 18k yellow gold, silver, black enamel, 3.4 x 3.9mm pear shaped emerald, 3 x 3.4mm pale ruby, 5 rose cut diamonds (4 x 1.5mm rose cut diamonds, 1 2mm)
  • Age: c. 1740
  • Condition: Excellent - very minor wear to the enamel, diamond setting on one of the shoulders shows signs of repair
  • Size: US 3.5, cannot be resized
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
less
more
GEORGIAN (1714 - 1837) The Georgian Era was named for the English Kings George I, II, III and IV. Within the powerful nations of France and England, fine gemstone jewelry was worn only by the extremely wealthy, and the styles were regal and ornate. As imperialist war raged in the Americas, Caribbean, Australia, and beyond, the jewelry industry benefited: colored gems from all over the empire became newly available. A mix of artistic influences from around Europe contributed to the feminine, glittering jewels of the era. Dense, ornate Baroque motifs from Italy showed up in Georgian jewelry, as did French Rococo’s undulating flora and fauna. Neoclassical style made use of Greek and Roman motifs, which were newly popular due to the recently uncovered ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Lapidary methods improved: the dome-shaped rose cut was popular, as was the “old mine cut”, a very early iteration of today’s round brilliant cut. The boat-shaped marquise diamond cut was developed around this time, supposedly to imitate the smile of Louis XV’s mistress, the marquise de Pompadour. Paste—an imitation gemstone made from leaded glass—was newly developed in the 18th century, and set into jewelry with the same creativity and care as its more precious counterparts. Real and imitation gems were almost always set in closed-backed settings, lined on the underside with thin sheets of foil to enhance the color of the stone and highlight it's sparkle. This makes Georgian rings tough for modern women to wear, especially on an everyday basis: genteel, jewelry-owning ladies of the 18th century were not famous for working with their hands like we are. Nor did they wash their hands as much as we do. Water will virtually ruin a foiled setting, so take special care with your Georgian ring. Very little jewelry from this period is still in circulation, and it's very difficult to repair.
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more