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1920s Emerald and Diamond Square Cluster Ring

$1,400.00
About Details History
The emerald has been regarded as a mystical stone since antiquity. According to legend, one could see into the future by placing an emerald under the tongue. Worn on the person, it could protect against evil spells and cure diseases. Magical and curative properties aside, it has been prized for millennia for its incomparable verdant color. This stunning Deco cluster ring is set with a vibrant .26ct emerald. The bright, verdant stone is bezel-set within a frame of single cut diamonds. The cluster setting is rendered in platinum and sits atop an 18k yellow gold mounting with beautifully rendered gallery. The interior is engraved with "W. C. S. to N. M. H. 28-6-25."

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  • Materials: platinum-topped 18k yellow gold, .26ct emerald, 10 x .02ct single cut diamonds, 4 x .01ct single cut diamonds
  • Age: engraved for 1925
  • Condition: Very good - rubbing to the corners of the emerald, one diamond has a chip along the table facet that is visible under magnification
  • Size: 8.5, can be resized for an additional fee of $90; 9.2mm head diameter, 1.2mm hoop
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ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
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Sold
About Details History
The emerald has been regarded as a mystical stone since antiquity. According to legend, one could see into the future by placing an emerald under the tongue. Worn on the person, it could protect against evil spells and cure diseases. Magical and curative properties aside, it has been prized for millennia for its incomparable verdant color. This stunning Deco cluster ring is set with a vibrant .26ct emerald. The bright, verdant stone is bezel-set within a frame of single cut diamonds. The cluster setting is rendered in platinum and sits atop an 18k yellow gold mounting with beautifully rendered gallery. The interior is engraved with "W. C. S. to N. M. H. 28-6-25."

less
more

  • Materials: platinum-topped 18k yellow gold, .26ct emerald, 10 x .02ct single cut diamonds, 4 x .01ct single cut diamonds
  • Age: engraved for 1925
  • Condition: Very good - rubbing to the corners of the emerald, one diamond has a chip along the table facet that is visible under magnification
  • Size: 8.5, can be resized for an additional fee of $90; 9.2mm head diameter, 1.2mm hoop
less
more
ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
less
more