Copal Incense w/ Red Clay Burner

$30.00
About Details Inspiration

Copal is an aromatic tree resin that's been used as incense since pre-Columbian times. Sweet, heavy, and similar to frankincense, it's an intense smell that naturally lends itself to meditation and cleansing ceremonies. In Mexico it's offered to the souls of the deceased during "Day of the Dead" celebrations, and it's a familiar scent at sweat lodge ceremonies and everyday celebrations. This bundle of 20 copal sticks and matching hand-thrown burner are handmade in Southern Mexico by an all-female team of artisans. They gather the copal sap and red clay near their homes, and the ceramic bowls are thrown on a handmade wheel. A pit fire is built and burned for each firing. I was lucky enough to see this kind of women-run pottery collective in action when I spent time in Oaxaca with the @pocoapocoapoco residency, and it was a beautiful thing. 

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  • 20 x incense sticks measure 10" long. Clay burner is 2" wide and 1" tall. 
  • made by artisan women in Southern Mexico from natural red clay sourced in nearby agricultural fields and wood-fired (see pic). 
  • formed by hand on a simple, rustic wheel
  • unglazed, food safe, oven safe, but will stain if greasy items are placed inside
  • incense sticks are made in Mexico from locally sourced tree sap

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more

The word 'copal' first appeared in the English language in 1577. John Frampton wrote "They doe bring from the Newe Spaine (Mexico) twoo kindes of Rosine... the one is called Copall." By the 18th century, Europeans found copal resin to be a valuable ingredient in making a good wood varnish. It became widely used in the manufacture of furniture and picture frames. By the late 19th and early 20th century varnish manufacturers in England and America were using it on train carriages, greatly swelling its demand.

less
more

About Details Inspiration

Copal is an aromatic tree resin that's been used as incense since pre-Columbian times. Sweet, heavy, and similar to frankincense, it's an intense smell that naturally lends itself to meditation and cleansing ceremonies. In Mexico it's offered to the souls of the deceased during "Day of the Dead" celebrations, and it's a familiar scent at sweat lodge ceremonies and everyday celebrations. This bundle of 20 copal sticks and matching hand-thrown burner are handmade in Southern Mexico by an all-female team of artisans. They gather the copal sap and red clay near their homes, and the ceramic bowls are thrown on a handmade wheel. A pit fire is built and burned for each firing. I was lucky enough to see this kind of women-run pottery collective in action when I spent time in Oaxaca with the @pocoapocoapoco residency, and it was a beautiful thing. 

less
more

  • 20 x incense sticks measure 10" long. Clay burner is 2" wide and 1" tall. 
  • made by artisan women in Southern Mexico from natural red clay sourced in nearby agricultural fields and wood-fired (see pic). 
  • formed by hand on a simple, rustic wheel
  • unglazed, food safe, oven safe, but will stain if greasy items are placed inside
  • incense sticks are made in Mexico from locally sourced tree sap

less
more

The word 'copal' first appeared in the English language in 1577. John Frampton wrote "They doe bring from the Newe Spaine (Mexico) twoo kindes of Rosine... the one is called Copall." By the 18th century, Europeans found copal resin to be a valuable ingredient in making a good wood varnish. It became widely used in the manufacture of furniture and picture frames. By the late 19th and early 20th century varnish manufacturers in England and America were using it on train carriages, greatly swelling its demand.

less
more