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English Gate Bracelet with Heart-Shaped Padlock

$1,450.00
About Details History
Gate bracelets came into fashion during the late Victorian era, although their exact origins are uncertain. The word "gate" alludes to the interlocked, barred chain panels which are meant to emulate the gates and fences of English country estates. They're distinguished by a large heart shaped charm with a lock and (sometimes) a key, which functions as the clasp. Like so many other Victorian jewels, gate bracelets were created as a symbol of love and fidelity; they were often exchanged between lovers who were going to be separated for a period of time. This early 20th century iteration of the gate bracelet has an attractive wide chain that tapers to a point at the clasp. The padlock is secured with a fine safety chain.

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  • Materials: 9k yellow gold
  • Age: c. 1910
  • Condition: Very good
  • Size: 7" inner circumference, 5/8" width, heart lock measures 1 x 5/8"
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EDWARDIAN (1900 - 1910) The Edwardian era gets its name from King Edward VII’s brief reign at the beginning of the 20th century. His Danish bride Alexandra was young, lovely, and fashionable; with a taste for trendy pieces rendered in diamonds and pearls. The jewelry tended toward airy lightness, often in the form of lacy filigree. The world was changing rapidly, but lots of the jewelry still reflected the Victorian ideals of decorum and femininity. Ancient Roman and Greek influences remained popular. “White” jewelry became popular as plentiful deposits of platinum were discovered in Russia and improved smelting technology made it possible for jewelers to work in the noble metal. Platinum was seldom used by jewelers in earlier years owing both to its scarcity and high melting point. The jewelry trade took advantage of its rigid strength to create opulent openwork settings for increasingly brilliant diamonds. The old European cut was perfected, rounder and squatter than old mine. This took stone-cutting one step closer to the mathematically perfect round brilliant cut, which is the most popular diamond cut today. The now-iconic square Asscher cut was patented in 1902. Hot on the heels of platinum, the alloy mixture that produces white gold was formulated and patented in 1915 in New York City. With Europe in the grip of WW1, the American jewelry industry was poised to become a world leader and innovator.
less
more

About Details History
Gate bracelets came into fashion during the late Victorian era, although their exact origins are uncertain. The word "gate" alludes to the interlocked, barred chain panels which are meant to emulate the gates and fences of English country estates. They're distinguished by a large heart shaped charm with a lock and (sometimes) a key, which functions as the clasp. Like so many other Victorian jewels, gate bracelets were created as a symbol of love and fidelity; they were often exchanged between lovers who were going to be separated for a period of time. This early 20th century iteration of the gate bracelet has an attractive wide chain that tapers to a point at the clasp. The padlock is secured with a fine safety chain.

less
more

  • Materials: 9k yellow gold
  • Age: c. 1910
  • Condition: Very good
  • Size: 7" inner circumference, 5/8" width, heart lock measures 1 x 5/8"
less
more
EDWARDIAN (1900 - 1910) The Edwardian era gets its name from King Edward VII’s brief reign at the beginning of the 20th century. His Danish bride Alexandra was young, lovely, and fashionable; with a taste for trendy pieces rendered in diamonds and pearls. The jewelry tended toward airy lightness, often in the form of lacy filigree. The world was changing rapidly, but lots of the jewelry still reflected the Victorian ideals of decorum and femininity. Ancient Roman and Greek influences remained popular. “White” jewelry became popular as plentiful deposits of platinum were discovered in Russia and improved smelting technology made it possible for jewelers to work in the noble metal. Platinum was seldom used by jewelers in earlier years owing both to its scarcity and high melting point. The jewelry trade took advantage of its rigid strength to create opulent openwork settings for increasingly brilliant diamonds. The old European cut was perfected, rounder and squatter than old mine. This took stone-cutting one step closer to the mathematically perfect round brilliant cut, which is the most popular diamond cut today. The now-iconic square Asscher cut was patented in 1902. Hot on the heels of platinum, the alloy mixture that produces white gold was formulated and patented in 1915 in New York City. With Europe in the grip of WW1, the American jewelry industry was poised to become a world leader and innovator.
less
more