Art Deco Diamond Mosaic Ring

$1,800.00
About Details History
A diamond mosaic in platinum, made around 1925. The yellow gold swirling shoulder decoration is a remnant from an earlier time, before ornamentation gave way to geometric precision. The gem-set square face, though, is pure Art Deco. :white_small_square:Gorgeous openwork below the face lets the light illuminate the diamonds above. Tooled shoulders and milgrain edges make the whole thing extra-special.  

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  • Materials: 14k gold with platinum top, .23ct Old European cut center diamond, 4 old Euros each .05ct, and 12 more .02ct old Euros intermingled. 
  • Age: c. 1925
  • Condition: excellent 
  • Size: US 8.5; can be sized up or down for an additional fee of $90. Head measures 13.7mm.
  • Location: To see this piece in person, please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.  
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ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
less
more

About Details History
A diamond mosaic in platinum, made around 1925. The yellow gold swirling shoulder decoration is a remnant from an earlier time, before ornamentation gave way to geometric precision. The gem-set square face, though, is pure Art Deco. :white_small_square:Gorgeous openwork below the face lets the light illuminate the diamonds above. Tooled shoulders and milgrain edges make the whole thing extra-special.  

less
more

  • Materials: 14k gold with platinum top, .23ct Old European cut center diamond, 4 old Euros each .05ct, and 12 more .02ct old Euros intermingled. 
  • Age: c. 1925
  • Condition: excellent 
  • Size: US 8.5; can be sized up or down for an additional fee of $90. Head measures 13.7mm.
  • Location: To see this piece in person, please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.  
less
more
ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
less
more