Bow Ring (Diamond)

$2,250.00
About Details Inspiration

The sentimental Victorians used the "infinity knot" as a tidy metaphor for undying affection: it loops around itself in an eternal twist, forever and ever, never beginning and never ending.  In a time when lovers were often parted for long periods, it could be a comforting metaphor for intimacy despite being apart. Think about what would happen if you pulled both ends of this bow: the further the distance, the tighter the knot. We rescue turquoise cabochons from antique Indian jewelry that's destined for the smelter, and use 28 vintage stones to adorn the engagement-worthy diamond bow version. It's our signature 1909 piece.  

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  • Age: contemporary with antique stones.  Made to order in New York City. 
  • Metal: 14k white and yellow gold
  • Stones: 28 recycled diamonds 

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In Western jewelry, the infinity-symbol-shaped bow or knot has symbolized endless love and constancy as far back as 500AD, when it was employed in Celtic rings.  

 

 

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Allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of this piece, which will be built to your specifications.

About Details Inspiration

The sentimental Victorians used the "infinity knot" as a tidy metaphor for undying affection: it loops around itself in an eternal twist, forever and ever, never beginning and never ending.  In a time when lovers were often parted for long periods, it could be a comforting metaphor for intimacy despite being apart. Think about what would happen if you pulled both ends of this bow: the further the distance, the tighter the knot. We rescue turquoise cabochons from antique Indian jewelry that's destined for the smelter, and use 28 vintage stones to adorn the engagement-worthy diamond bow version. It's our signature 1909 piece.  

less
more

  • Age: contemporary with antique stones.  Made to order in New York City. 
  • Metal: 14k white and yellow gold
  • Stones: 28 recycled diamonds 

less
more

In Western jewelry, the infinity-symbol-shaped bow or knot has symbolized endless love and constancy as far back as 500AD, when it was employed in Celtic rings.  

 

 

less
more