Diamond Baguette Studs (Rose Gold)

$400.00
About Details Inspiration
The step (or "baguette") cut accentuates a diamond's luster, whiteness and clarity while downplaying its rainbow fire. Their crisp, clean lines made them all the rage during the Art Deco period, where they were most often seen surrounding a larger stone to draw attention inward. We think they deserve to stand alone; these stackable studs show off a diamond baguette's best qualities. Handmade exclusively for us by our friends at Charlie and Marcelle in Los Angeles, CA. 

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  • Materials: 14k rose gold, two .05ct white diamond baguettes (SI-1) measuring approx. 1.5 x 3.5mm. 
  • Age: contemporary. Handmade in Los Angeles by our friends at Charlie and Marcelle. 

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I assumed the baguette cut was named after the elongated French bread shape, but that's not true. The word baguette wasn't used to describe bread prior to 1900, but the word bague has been in use for centuries. In high school, I learned it as the word for "finger ring". However, until the seventeenth century the term was used to indicate jewels in general. Therefore the diminutive 'baguette' is translated as 'small jewel'. 

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Allow 4-5 weeks for delivery of this ring, which will be built to your specifications. Choose carefully, because it's FINAL SALE.

About Details Inspiration
The step (or "baguette") cut accentuates a diamond's luster, whiteness and clarity while downplaying its rainbow fire. Their crisp, clean lines made them all the rage during the Art Deco period, where they were most often seen surrounding a larger stone to draw attention inward. We think they deserve to stand alone; these stackable studs show off a diamond baguette's best qualities. Handmade exclusively for us by our friends at Charlie and Marcelle in Los Angeles, CA. 

less
more

  • Materials: 14k rose gold, two .05ct white diamond baguettes (SI-1) measuring approx. 1.5 x 3.5mm. 
  • Age: contemporary. Handmade in Los Angeles by our friends at Charlie and Marcelle. 

less
more

I assumed the baguette cut was named after the elongated French bread shape, but that's not true. The word baguette wasn't used to describe bread prior to 1900, but the word bague has been in use for centuries. In high school, I learned it as the word for "finger ring". However, until the seventeenth century the term was used to indicate jewels in general. Therefore the diminutive 'baguette' is translated as 'small jewel'. 

less
more