Tiffany & Co Art Nouveau .60ct Diamond Engagement Ring

$5,000.00
About Details History
The company we now know as Tiffany & Co. was founded in 1837 under the name "Tiffany, Young and Ellis". Originally, the business was a retailer of luxury dry goods and stationery, it wasn't until 1853 when the name was changed to the famous "Tiffany & Co" and the focus targeted expressly on jewelry. When this stunning engagement ring was made the company was headed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, celebrated artist and son of founder Charles Tiffany. The jewelry and objects produced under his directorship are arguably among the finest ever manufactured by this illustrious house. This ring is fashioned in platinum with .60ct transitional cut diamond (F-G/SI2) at the center. The stone is offset by two sparkly single cut diamonds, and the gallery and shoulders are adorned with exquisite Art Nouveau themed filigree. This ring comes with an EGL diamond certificate and appraisal for the center stone.

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  • Materials: platinum, .60ct transitional cut (F-G/SI2), 2 x .02ct single cut diamonds
  • Age: c. 1915
  • Condition: Excellent
  • Size: US 4, can be (slightly) resized for an additional fee of $90; 6.5mm head, .8mm hoop
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Nolita, NYC
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ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
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Sold
About Details History
The company we now know as Tiffany & Co. was founded in 1837 under the name "Tiffany, Young and Ellis". Originally, the business was a retailer of luxury dry goods and stationery, it wasn't until 1853 when the name was changed to the famous "Tiffany & Co" and the focus targeted expressly on jewelry. When this stunning engagement ring was made the company was headed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, celebrated artist and son of founder Charles Tiffany. The jewelry and objects produced under his directorship are arguably among the finest ever manufactured by this illustrious house. This ring is fashioned in platinum with .60ct transitional cut diamond (F-G/SI2) at the center. The stone is offset by two sparkly single cut diamonds, and the gallery and shoulders are adorned with exquisite Art Nouveau themed filigree. This ring comes with an EGL diamond certificate and appraisal for the center stone.

less
more

  • Materials: platinum, .60ct transitional cut (F-G/SI2), 2 x .02ct single cut diamonds
  • Age: c. 1915
  • Condition: Excellent
  • Size: US 4, can be (slightly) resized for an additional fee of $90; 6.5mm head, .8mm hoop
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Nolita, NYC
less
more
ART DECO (1915 – 1940) Art Deco is highly recognizable for its minimalism and futurism. Simultaneous art movements—Cubism, Bauhaus—informed the geometric style, along with “exotic” foreign influences like the Ballet Russe. Motifs like ziggurats and sunbursts, stripped of visual clutter, conveyed the optimism of an increasingly technological world. In jewelry, the predominant use of white metals let colorful gems take center stage. Stones that were opaque and true in color, like lapis lazuli, onyx, jade, coral, and opal were worked into designs alongside more precious and brilliant gems, like diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Extra-long beaded necklaces and tasseled “sautoirs” followed the narrow flapper silhouette. The baguette cut was an Art Deco innovation, and the decade saw increased use of other angular diamond cuts, like the precise caliber cut and the emerald cut. Synthetic gems, like sapphires, were celebrated as a scientific marvel. Marcel Tolkowsky, 21 years old at the time, published the design for the round brilliant cut in 1919.
less
more