Evil Eye Necklace

$145.00
About Details Inspiration

Since at least ancient Roman times, people have believed that jealousy can be transmitted as a curse. The "evil eye" could actually be poisonous, and as protection, talismans were developed to reflect the harmful gaze back toward the spell-caster. They appear in slightly different forms in many cultures; blue glass discs like this one (known as "nazars") appear throughout the Arab world. Each of our nazars, handmade in Turkey, have been set into a pendant based on an exquisite gold antique malochhio, the Italian version of the evil eye amulet. 

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  • Handmade in our Brooklyn studio.
  • Materials: glass Turkish glass eye, brass pendant, gold fill chain and findings. 
  • Measurements: 18" chain, 3/8" circular pendant (not including loop at top).

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In some observant Jewish communities, there's a verbal talisman to ward off envious harm. After mentioning a piece of good luck, one's children, or a valuable possession, the speaker or listener might say "b'li ayin hara" (Hebrew), meaning "without an evil eye", or "kein eina hara" (Yiddish) "no evil eye". 

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About Details Inspiration

Since at least ancient Roman times, people have believed that jealousy can be transmitted as a curse. The "evil eye" could actually be poisonous, and as protection, talismans were developed to reflect the harmful gaze back toward the spell-caster. They appear in slightly different forms in many cultures; blue glass discs like this one (known as "nazars") appear throughout the Arab world. Each of our nazars, handmade in Turkey, have been set into a pendant based on an exquisite gold antique malochhio, the Italian version of the evil eye amulet. 

less
more

  • Handmade in our Brooklyn studio.
  • Materials: glass Turkish glass eye, brass pendant, gold fill chain and findings. 
  • Measurements: 18" chain, 3/8" circular pendant (not including loop at top).

less
more

In some observant Jewish communities, there's a verbal talisman to ward off envious harm. After mentioning a piece of good luck, one's children, or a valuable possession, the speaker or listener might say "b'li ayin hara" (Hebrew), meaning "without an evil eye", or "kein eina hara" (Yiddish) "no evil eye". 

less
more