Lover's Blue Eye Pendant / Brooch

$4,900.00
About Details
A “lover’s eye” miniature was a tiny painting - usually watercolor on ivory - presented to a loved one. The idea behind this very short-lived Georgian-era fad (c.1790 through 1820) was that the eye would be recognizable only to the recipient and could, therefore, be worn publicly keeping the lover’s identity a secret. They are EXTREMELY rare and sought-after. Since there were so few of them and so many people want them, they are very often faked. The vast, vast majority of the Lover's Eye jewelry in circulation is not actually from the Georgian era. Antiques Roadshow wrote about forgeries and how to detect them: read more here.  We can't claim to be experts on recognizing real vs. faked lover's eyes, but we DO have an antiques dealer we completely and utterly trust - this is her specialty and she has many decades of experience under her belt. She approached us with this spectacular - and ultra-rare - brooch, which can also be worn as a pendant via the loop at the top. We have not purchased it from her, but if we find a buyer, we will. To respect everyone's privacy, please do not share or repost this image in any way. 

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  • Materials: gold, glass, watercolor eye. 
  • Age: made between 1790 through 1820 
  • Condition: We suspect the gold back was replaced at some point. The front is immaculate, with the original painting, frame, and casing. 
  • Size: about 2" wide. 

 

 

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About Details
A “lover’s eye” miniature was a tiny painting - usually watercolor on ivory - presented to a loved one. The idea behind this very short-lived Georgian-era fad (c.1790 through 1820) was that the eye would be recognizable only to the recipient and could, therefore, be worn publicly keeping the lover’s identity a secret. They are EXTREMELY rare and sought-after. Since there were so few of them and so many people want them, they are very often faked. The vast, vast majority of the Lover's Eye jewelry in circulation is not actually from the Georgian era. Antiques Roadshow wrote about forgeries and how to detect them: read more here.  We can't claim to be experts on recognizing real vs. faked lover's eyes, but we DO have an antiques dealer we completely and utterly trust - this is her specialty and she has many decades of experience under her belt. She approached us with this spectacular - and ultra-rare - brooch, which can also be worn as a pendant via the loop at the top. We have not purchased it from her, but if we find a buyer, we will. To respect everyone's privacy, please do not share or repost this image in any way. 

less
more
 

  • Materials: gold, glass, watercolor eye. 
  • Age: made between 1790 through 1820 
  • Condition: We suspect the gold back was replaced at some point. The front is immaculate, with the original painting, frame, and casing. 
  • Size: about 2" wide. 

 

 

less
more