Midcentury .74ct Emerald Cut Diamond Ring with Cinched Shoulders

$6,000.00
About Details History
The emerald cut - named for the green gemstone for which the cut was purportedly conceived - is a long step cut with beveled corners. This vintage engagement ring features a .74ct emerald cut diamond with softly arced diamond-studded shoulders that curve away from the face and feature a cinched element where they join the hoop. A pretty combination of curves and angles fashioned in platinum. This ring comes with a GIA Dossier certificate for the center stone.

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  • Materials: platinum, .74ct emerald cut diamond (F/VS2), 2 x .05ct single cuts, 4 x .01ct single cuts
  • Age: c. 1950
  • Condition: Excellent
  • Size: 7, can be resized; 1.1mm hoop
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
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RETRO (1935 - 1945) World War II marked the shift from Art Deco to retro, as yet another war (and the subsequent materials rations) dictated what was available on the jewelry market. Platinum was reserved for military use, so jewelers began relying heavily on gold and experimenting with colored alloys and different finishes. Retro jewelry designs are marked by asymmetry, motifs borrowed from industrial design, and exaggerated scale. Thanks to a hugely successful advertising campaign begun in the 1940s and funded by De Beers, the phrase “a diamond is forever” was coined and diamond rings were touted as the ONLY acceptable type of engagement ring. Carefully worded ads instructed men on how to choose a stone, and what to spend (“two months salary!”). The Gemological Institute of America developed the so-called “4Cs” of diamond grading, which was a scientific system for measuring the color, clarity, cut and carat weight of every single diamond. The costume jewelry industry, having only been established a few decades before, began to flourish. Centered in Providence, Rhode Island, and surrounding New England towns, companies like Trifari, Monet, Hobe, and Vendome prospered as consumers gobbled up inexpensive machine-made jewels.
less
more

About Details History
The emerald cut - named for the green gemstone for which the cut was purportedly conceived - is a long step cut with beveled corners. This vintage engagement ring features a .74ct emerald cut diamond with softly arced diamond-studded shoulders that curve away from the face and feature a cinched element where they join the hoop. A pretty combination of curves and angles fashioned in platinum. This ring comes with a GIA Dossier certificate for the center stone.

less
more

  • Materials: platinum, .74ct emerald cut diamond (F/VS2), 2 x .05ct single cuts, 4 x .01ct single cuts
  • Age: c. 1950
  • Condition: Excellent
  • Size: 7, can be resized; 1.1mm hoop
  • Location: To see this ring in person please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
less
more
RETRO (1935 - 1945) World War II marked the shift from Art Deco to retro, as yet another war (and the subsequent materials rations) dictated what was available on the jewelry market. Platinum was reserved for military use, so jewelers began relying heavily on gold and experimenting with colored alloys and different finishes. Retro jewelry designs are marked by asymmetry, motifs borrowed from industrial design, and exaggerated scale. Thanks to a hugely successful advertising campaign begun in the 1940s and funded by De Beers, the phrase “a diamond is forever” was coined and diamond rings were touted as the ONLY acceptable type of engagement ring. Carefully worded ads instructed men on how to choose a stone, and what to spend (“two months salary!”). The Gemological Institute of America developed the so-called “4Cs” of diamond grading, which was a scientific system for measuring the color, clarity, cut and carat weight of every single diamond. The costume jewelry industry, having only been established a few decades before, began to flourish. Centered in Providence, Rhode Island, and surrounding New England towns, companies like Trifari, Monet, Hobe, and Vendome prospered as consumers gobbled up inexpensive machine-made jewels.
less
more