Stuart Pink Foiled Rock Crystal Earrings

$1,600.00
About Details History

The faded, crinkled, gorgeous rose-colored foil behind the rock crystal gems in these c.1700 earrings were likely once a very bright pink. The pastel hue is the result of 300+ years of mellow aging. The wig hooks may have been designed to attach the earrings to your hairdo, helping take the weight of the jewels off of your earlobes. They also serve to keep the gems facing forward. The hoops insert back-to-front. Please take special care not to get these spectacular earrings wet: moisture that gets behind the crystal could darken the pretty pink foil.  

less
more

  • Materials: silver tone metal (not sterling silver) with cut crystal gems and pale pink crackly foil backings.  
  • Age: c. 1700
  • Condition: excellent considering age. Foil is (beautifully) faded. 
  • Size: gems measure 1/2" x 7/16".
  • Location: To see this piece in person, please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. 

 

less
more
GEORGIAN (1714 - 1837) The Georgian Era was named for the English Kings George I, II, III and IV. Within the powerful nations of France and England, fine gemstone jewelry was worn only by the extremely wealthy, and the styles were regal and ornate. As imperialist war raged in the Americas, Caribbean, Australia, and beyond, the jewelry industry benefited: colored gems from all over the empire became newly available. A mix of artistic influences from around Europe contributed to the feminine, glittering jewels of the era. Dense, ornate Baroque motifs from Italy showed up in Georgian jewelry, as did French Rococo’s undulating flora and fauna. Neoclassical style made use of Greek and Roman motifs, which were newly popular due to the recently uncovered ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Lapidary methods improved: the dome-shaped rose cut was popular, as was the “old mine cut”, a very early iteration of today’s round brilliant cut. The boat-shaped marquise diamond cut was developed around this time, supposedly to imitate the smile of Louis XV’s mistress, the marquise de Pompadour. Paste—an imitation gemstone made from leaded glass—was newly developed in the 18th century, and set into jewelry with the same creativity and care as its more precious counterparts. Real and imitation gems were almost always set in closed-backed settings, lined on the underside with thin sheets of foil to enhance the color of the stone and highlight it's sparkle. This makes Georgian rings tough for modern women to wear, especially on an everyday basis: genteel, jewelry-owning ladies of the 18th century were not famous for working with their hands like we are. Nor did they wash their hands as much as we do. Water will virtually ruin a foiled setting, so take special care with your Georgian ring. Very little jewelry from this period is still in circulation, and it's very difficult to repair.
less
more

About Details History

The faded, crinkled, gorgeous rose-colored foil behind the rock crystal gems in these c.1700 earrings were likely once a very bright pink. The pastel hue is the result of 300+ years of mellow aging. The wig hooks may have been designed to attach the earrings to your hairdo, helping take the weight of the jewels off of your earlobes. They also serve to keep the gems facing forward. The hoops insert back-to-front. Please take special care not to get these spectacular earrings wet: moisture that gets behind the crystal could darken the pretty pink foil.  

less
more

  • Materials: silver tone metal (not sterling silver) with cut crystal gems and pale pink crackly foil backings.  
  • Age: c. 1700
  • Condition: excellent considering age. Foil is (beautifully) faded. 
  • Size: gems measure 1/2" x 7/16".
  • Location: To see this piece in person, please visit our shop in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. 

 

less
more
GEORGIAN (1714 - 1837) The Georgian Era was named for the English Kings George I, II, III and IV. Within the powerful nations of France and England, fine gemstone jewelry was worn only by the extremely wealthy, and the styles were regal and ornate. As imperialist war raged in the Americas, Caribbean, Australia, and beyond, the jewelry industry benefited: colored gems from all over the empire became newly available. A mix of artistic influences from around Europe contributed to the feminine, glittering jewels of the era. Dense, ornate Baroque motifs from Italy showed up in Georgian jewelry, as did French Rococo’s undulating flora and fauna. Neoclassical style made use of Greek and Roman motifs, which were newly popular due to the recently uncovered ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Lapidary methods improved: the dome-shaped rose cut was popular, as was the “old mine cut”, a very early iteration of today’s round brilliant cut. The boat-shaped marquise diamond cut was developed around this time, supposedly to imitate the smile of Louis XV’s mistress, the marquise de Pompadour. Paste—an imitation gemstone made from leaded glass—was newly developed in the 18th century, and set into jewelry with the same creativity and care as its more precious counterparts. Real and imitation gems were almost always set in closed-backed settings, lined on the underside with thin sheets of foil to enhance the color of the stone and highlight it's sparkle. This makes Georgian rings tough for modern women to wear, especially on an everyday basis: genteel, jewelry-owning ladies of the 18th century were not famous for working with their hands like we are. Nor did they wash their hands as much as we do. Water will virtually ruin a foiled setting, so take special care with your Georgian ring. Very little jewelry from this period is still in circulation, and it's very difficult to repair.
less
more